ABOUT THE ALZHEIMER'S IMPACT MOVEMENT


AIM, the sister organization of the Alzheimer’s Association, is a nonpartisan, nonprofit advocacy organization. AIM works in strategic partnership with the Alzheimer’s Association to make Alzheimer’s a national priority. Thanks to the support of its members, AIM has driven Congress to take historic steps to address the Alzheimer’s crisis — but much more remains to be done.


Why AIM?

Today an estimated 5.5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease. And, at a cost of $259 billion a year, Alzheimer’s is the most expensive disease in the nation. Barring the development of medical breakthroughs to prevent, stop or slow Alzheimer’s disease, these numbers will rapidly increase.

It is because of this trajectory and the impact of the disease on families that AIM works to advance public policies to enhance care and support, as well as to accelerate research.

As a 501(c)(4), AIM is able to engage with lawmakers in all elements of their job — including activities considered electoral or political — to keep the Alzheimer’s community and our issues top-of-mind with elected officials.

AIM impresses upon our elected officials the growing crisis Alzheimer’s presents to our nation's families and the economy. In doing so, AIM is inspiring these leaders to take bold action to address Alzheimer’s.

How AIM Does It

AIM amplifies the voice of Alzheimer’s Association advocates — to lend them even more power. AIM carries this message to halls of Congress on behalf of the hundreds of thousands of Alzheimer’s advocates across the country.

Examples of what AIM can and has done include:

  • Advocating for legislation that advances research, and enhances care and support services for those living with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers.

  • Supporting the re-election of our Congressional champions in both parties. If they fight for us, we’ll fight for them.

  • Speaking on behalf of the Alzheimer’s community throughout each election cycle, when 501(c)(3) organizations like the Alzheimer’s Association must remain silent.




Victories

Thanks to the combined work of AIM and the Alzheimer’s Association, our community has celebrated historic advancements in Alzheimer’s public policy. Together, and with the tireless work of our advocates, we have:

  • Developed with Congress the National Alzheimer’s Project Act (NAPA), resulting in the first National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease with the goal of preventing and effectively treating Alzheimer’s by 2025.

  • Created the concept of the Alzheimer’s Accountability Act (AAA). Once introduced, AIM and the Association were the only organizations to lobby in support of the bill which was enacted into law that same year. AAA and has transformed discussions about Alzheimer’s research funding on Capitol Hill.

  • Propelled the U.S. government to rise to the Alzheimer’s challenge, resulting in more than a doubling of Alzheimer’s research funding in just five years. Including an historic increase of $350 million in fiscal year 2016.

  • Supported the 21st Century Cures Act to bolster medical research to accelerate the discovery, development and delivery of new treatments and cures for Alzheimer’s and other diseases.

  • Conceived of and championed the HOPE for Alzheimer’s Act to provide Medicare coverage for comprehensive care planning services for those living with Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive impairments. Because of our efforts, congressional cosponsorship soared, and in November 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) finalized a decision to pay for cognitive and functional assessments and care planning.

  • Made Alzheimer’s a national priority on the 2016 campaign trail. Alzheimer’s became an issue at candidate debates, in candidate’s advertising, and for the first time in our nation’s history, an incoming president has declared Alzheimer’s disease would be a priority of his administration.

  • Worked with state governments to create State Alzheimer’s Plans in nearly every state.

  • Worked with House and Senate bipartisan champions to secure the largest increase in federal funding for Alzheimer’s research at the National Institutes of Health, for the second year in a row — a $400 million increase in fiscal year 2017. This historic increase marks the first time total federal funding for Alzheimer’s research surpassed $1 billion.