Join Our Advocacy Team

Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s and all other dementia. Join us in this fight by becoming an advocate.


Thanks to the tireless work of our advocates, we’ve passed critical legislation and significantly increased federal research funding. But our work isn’t done. We need dedicated, passionate advocates like you to build on this success in Congress and in state capitals throughout our nation. Whatever your availability or your experience, we want you to make a difference by sharing your story and joining our volunteer team.

Join the Cause














Advocates

Take action and help us advance our mission. As a volunteer advocate, you’ll make your voice heard, drive policymakers to address Alzheimer’s and other dementia, and improve the lives of everyone affected by Alzheimer’s. Your level of commitment is completely flexible to fit your schedule, style and skills.

  • Do you want to share your personal experience as a caregiver? You can share your story with your elected officials and tell them how they can help.
  • Are you a social media guru? You can post on Twitter or Facebook and tag elected officials asking them to help on our issues.
  • Do you work odd hours but have time to write? You can submit letters to the editor to your local newspaper about your story, asking others to contact their elected officials for help.

These are just a few examples. Connect with us and let’s figure out what works for you!

Leadership Opportunities

Below are additional leadership opportunities for select advocates looking to take the next step in advancing our mission:

Ambassaddors

Develop deep relationships with their assigned members of Congress.

Congressional Team Members

Bring their own unique stories, relationships and skills to complement the work of an Ambassador.

State Champions

Cultivate multifaceted, year-round relationships with targeted state officials.

Thanks to the support of its members, AIM has driven policymakers to take historic steps to address the Alzheimer's crisis — but much more remains to be done.