Renewing the National Commitment to Fight Alzheimer's

Congress has made great progress in the fight against Alzheimer’s and all other dementia. Thanks to bipartisan congressional champions and dedicated advocates, federal research funding has grown, and individuals living with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers have access to better quality care and support services. But more work remains.

What is the NAPA Reauthorization Act?

The bipartisan NAPA Reauthorization Act (S. 4203/H.R. 7775) would build on the progress made in the fight against Alzheimer’s and other dementia over the last decade by reauthorizing the National Alzheimer’s Project Act (NAPA) (P.L. 111-375), landmark legislation signed into law in 2011.

Introduced by Sens. Susan Collins (R-Maine), Mark Warner (D-Va.), Ed Markey (D-Mass.), Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.V.), Bob Menendez (D-N.J.), and Jerry Moran (R-KS) in the Senate, Reps. Paul Tonko (D-N.Y), Chris Smith (R-N.J.) and Maxine Waters (D-C.A) in the House, the NAPA Reauthorization Act will extend NAPA.

The NAPA Reauthorization Act emphasizes the importance of healthy aging and risk reduction for Alzheimer’s disease to reflect the new sixth goal of the National Plan. The legislation also adds new federal representatives to the NAPA Advisory Council from the Department of Justice (DoJ), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and the Social Security Administration (SSA). Additionally, the NAPA Reauthorization Act underscores and seeks to help address health disparities among underrepresented populations.

NAPA funding
Alzheimer's federal policy advancements

What is the Alzheimer's Accountability and Investment Act

With the original provisions of the landmark legislation the Alzheimer’s Accountability Act (enacted in 2014) set to expire in 2025, Congress must renew its commitment to ensure that progress continues to be made in Alzheimer’s and dementia research. The bipartisan Alzheimer’s Accountability and Investment Act (S. 4202/H.R. 7773) would continue to prioritize Alzheimer’s and dementia research funding at the NIH.

Introduced by Sens. Susan Collins (R-Maine), Ed Markey (D-Mass.), Mark Warner (D-VA), Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV), Bob Menendez (D-NJ), and Jerry Moran (R-KS), and Reps. Chris Smith (R-N.J.), Paul Tonko (D-N.Y.) and Maxine Waters (D-C.A.), the Alzheimer’s Accountability and Investment Act would require the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to continue to submit an annual Professional Judgment Budget to Congress to ensure Alzheimer’s and dementia research is funded at the levels needed to achieve the goals in the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease.

With robust and steady investment, scientists will be able to work at a more rapid pace to advance basic disease knowledge, explore ways to reduce risk, uncover new biomarkers for early diagnosis and drug targeting, and develop potential treatments.

AIM is proud to support these important bipartisan bills. Join us to help us grow support for the NAPA Reauthorization Act and the Alzheimer’s Accountability and Investment Act in Congress.

Take Action

Pass the Alzheimer’s Accountability and Investment Act


Urge your elected officials to advance the Alzheimer’s Accountability and Investment Act, which would help ensure that progress continues to be made in Alzheimer’s and dementia research and that Congress continues hearing directly from the scientists at NIH on how much research funding is needed.

Renew Our Nation’s Commitment to Addressing Alzheimer’s


Advocates are urging Congress to build upon the past decade of progress by updating and expanding the work of the National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA). Act now to urge your elected officials to continue to advance the NAPA Reauthorization Act.

Send a Letter to the Editor


Letters-to-the-Editor (LTE) are a great way to grow support for our public policy priorities. Click below for talking points that can be used to help you write a LTE urging your member to cosponsor the NAPA Reauthorization Act and the Alzheimer’s Accountability and Investment Act.

Join us as an advocacy volunteer


With help from volunteers like you we’re making sure policymakers hear directly from people impacted by Alzheimer’s. But our work isn’t done. Join us.