New York State Alzheimer’s Plan Overview 

Support
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The New York State Coordinating Council for Services Related to Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias was established in 2007 by Public Health Law § 2004-a (Chapter 58 of the Laws of 2007, Part B). The Council was formed to facilitate interagency planning and policymaking, review specific agency initiatives for their impact on the care of people living with dementia and their families, and provide a continuing forum for discussions related to creating a comprehensive state policy for Alzheimer’s disease. Charged with providing reports to the governor and the legislature every two years beginning in June 2009, the Council provides policy recommendations for addressing the Alzheimer’s crisis and a review of services to meet the needs of people living with dementia and their families. In December 2009, New York released its first state Alzheimer’s plan, the Annual Report of the New York State Coordinating Council for Services Related to Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias, with updated reports published every two years thereafter. New York released the most recent report in 2019, the 2019 Report of the New York State Coordinating Council for Services Related to Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias.

New York 2022 Policy Priorities

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Support Dementia Caregivers 

Family caregivers play a critical role in supporting people living with dementia. New York has been a leader in supporting family caregivers with the Alzheimer’s Disease Caregiver Support Initiative. This evidence-based initiative delays the placement of individuals living with dementia in long-term care, helps families avoid quickly depleting their income and savings to pay for more costly care, and allows community partners to expand statewide programs and services that empower New Yorkers to be proactive in their approach to Alzheimer's. The Alzheimer’s Association is urging New York state lawmakers to continue supporting dementia caregivers by preserving the current funding level of $25 million for the Alzheimer’s Disease Caregiver Support Initiative in the final 2022-2023 State Budget.

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Establish Certification Criteria for Memory Care

New York must help ensure those living with Alzheimer’s and other dementia are provided the specialized care nursing homes advertise. There is currently no certification criteria for what constitutes memory care for residents in nursing homes. The Alzheimer’s Association urges Governor Hochul to release a memory care certification plan in a 30-Day Amendment so stakeholders can review the policy to ensure it aligns with best practices in dementia care. It is vital that this proposal seeks to better equip staff in long-term care communities and ensure individuals living with dementia receive the quality of care they deserve.

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Preserve Alzheimer’s Disease Public Health Funding

The Alzheimer’s Association urges New York state lawmakers to preserve the current funding level of $1.37 million for the Alzheimer’s Disease Public Health Funding in the final 2022-2023 State Budget.This funding is critical to maintaining our state's dementia-capable public health infrastructure. By providing a two-pronged systems investment focusing on community support while also equipping the medical system to provide early diagnoses, quality care management, and linkages to community services, New York will help individuals living with dementia throughout the state. 

Find My Chapter

Together, we’re making an impact. Find an Alzheimer’s Association chapter in your community for more ways to engage.

Contact Us

State Affairs Contact: Bill Gustafson

Phone: 585.802.7922

Email: [email protected]

410,000

people living with Alzheimer’s in New York

563,000

New Yorkers are providing unpaid care

$5.5 Billion

Medicaid cost of caring for people living with Alzheimer’s (2020)

835 Million

increase in Alzheimer’s deaths since 2000

16%

in hospice with a primary diagnosis of dementia

44.0%

increase of geriatricians in New York needed to meet the demand in 2050